Tag: portrait

Cancer Man

This is a revisit of a photo I captured a number of years ago when I was still shooting with poorer quality glass and a smaller camera body. While the camera setup did not result in the highest quality photos, it did have lend an interesting softer, almost illustrated quality to images. As you can see here in Cancer Man, the hands and hat, while in focus, feel somewhat liquid, like an oil painting.

This photo, while heavily edited, is not a composite – at least not in a traditional sense. We shot this in an old, burned out and abandoned mill along the Jones Falls in Baltimore. The barrel, smoke, dust and various other industrial elements were captured in camera. The high key, spot lighting is coming from a strobe placed behind a shattered window hidden behind the wall on the left side of the frame. The model’s face, the smoke replacing it and the red wash, were really the only elements added in post.

cancer man

Tearclops

This is a revisit of a photo collaboration with Michael Anthony Farley from a portrait project with LED Baltimore from a few years back. Farley was at the time an active drag performer and huge Blade Runner fan. So we decided to integrate both interests, with a portrait concept based upon the candy eating geisha that is seen on digital signage throughout the film.

Recently, I’ve been going back through my archives of past work and picking up photographs from the cutting room floor, and taking them for an unbridled and exploratory adventure in Photoshop. Really, just taking an image and modifying it organically, with no real plan beyond whatever the current state of composition.

This is a technique I learned to appreciate with wood carving. When carving wood you can force or pursue specific imagery, but with the medium being an imperfect and organic material, I find my best work comes from going with the flow, finding the grain and working along it. This is particularly true when working with manual hand tools, like chisels and knives. The work is slow going and over time, as you continue to work the wood, you begin to feel rather than see what you’re working on. All in all, the process is quite cathartic and generally inspires work that is genrally more creative than any single concept or flourish.

This editing process isn’t much different. I apply many, lightly modified layers, primarily through brush work and finer (ab)use of the liquify tool. Rather than forcing photorealism, allowing imperfections in skin cloning and layer transparency to give the new image a surreal sense of movement, depth and emotion.

geisha candy

the AmeriZika Project

This is a project inspired by the circus that is current US Presidential Primary elections.

Bern

Feeling it (the Bern)

Betsy

Besty (the Seamstress)

Hillary's Golden Handcuffs

Hillary (Wrapped in Obama) – the vertical strip of text is a quote from Debbie Wasserman Schultz, ‘Unpledged delegates exist really to make sure that party leaders and elected officials don’t have to be in a position where they are running against grassroots activists,’ “

Free dog photography in Baltimore

It looks like pet owners in Maryland have reason to celebrate. Baltimore’s own, Puptrait Studio is waiving all sitting fees for local dog owners. If you’re looking for high quality, affordable dog photography now is the time to act. We have it on good word they still have a few weekend and evening slots still available – but they are going fast! Claim your free dog photo session before they’re gone.

Perils of Glamour

They say you find inspiration in the strangest of places. But I think the truth of the matter is, most artists find strange inspiration in the most mundane of places. Here’s a recent example of it happening to me…

As some of you might know, I got engaged recently. And as tradition dictates, I had to find a ring. So, I went to one of the larger jewelers in the area. Eventually I found something I thought my fiance would like. While the clerk was off boxing the ring, I had a minute to myself. When I looked around the store I was taken aback at who else was in there with me – first at the almost obscene display of wealth and then more so by how sickly everyone looked. Now, part of that was the harsh overhead lighting used in the store – turns out, the lighting used to make gems brighter, doesn’t do much for most complexions – but what I saw went beyond that. There must have been two dozen customers wandering about the store and it was as if the more expensive and excessive their furs and jewels, the more sickly they had become.

I went home and began replaying the incident in my head, when I had what I believe alcoholics refer to as a moment of clarity

What if all these luxury items we’re taught to aspire to – diamonds, gold, furs, etc. – were actually poisoning us, literally sucking us dry, not just financially, but physically and spiritually? And, if that was the case, what would that look like?

The photos are my attempt at answering those questions.

Model credit: Charlie Will